Tag: microbes

The Two Faces of Candida

As you know, I like to keep up on research on all the different components of the human biome, so yesterday,  I read an article in the International Journal of Medial Microbiology about fungi.[i]  There were a bunch of really interesting facts which I’ll… Continue Reading “The Two Faces of Candida”

The Price for a High Sugar Diet Early in Life – Memory Issues Later

Today’s post is about interesting research out of the University of Southern California, UCLA and the University of Georgia, looking at the relationship of sugary drinks early in life to cognitive issues later on.[i]  Here’s a fact that I didn’t know:  according to the… Continue Reading “The Price for a High Sugar Diet Early in Life – Memory Issues Later”

Feelings and the Microbiome: How Wisdom and Loneliness Affect Microbiota Health

I’ll lay off the prebiotics for today, and give you something completely different, to start off this new month. We all know by now about the bi-directional relationship between the brain and the gut.  I’ve talked about it plenty of times on this blog,… Continue Reading “Feelings and the Microbiome: How Wisdom and Loneliness Affect Microbiota Health”

Short Term Increase in Prebiotic Fibers Makes a Big Difference

I’m on a bit of a fiber kick right now! A study just came out of the University of California, Irvin, which caught my interest.  Did you know that on average, Americans eat way less than 50% of the recommended daily intake of fiber?  … Continue Reading “Short Term Increase in Prebiotic Fibers Makes a Big Difference”

Prebiotics: What We Currently Know About Their Use in Neuropsychiatric and Neurodegenerative Diseases

One of the questions I get asked the most by my readers is “what prebiotic and/or probiotic is the best?”  Unfortunately, there is no good answer to that because we just don’t have the research to know.  To boot, everyone’s body is different.  Still,… Continue Reading “Prebiotics: What We Currently Know About Their Use in Neuropsychiatric and Neurodegenerative Diseases”

L. reuteri and Immune Protection for Babies

Interesting new research on the relationship between the maternal microbiome and the immune system in infants was just published by in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science[i].  Using a mouse model, scientists from the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine found that the… Continue Reading “L. reuteri and Immune Protection for Babies”

Clear Pattern Emerges for Gut Bacterial Alterations in Parkinson’s Disease

Another step forward in sorting out the Parkinson’s disease (PD)/microbiome connection.  Researchers at the Quadram Institute in the UK conducted a meta-analysis of the gut microbiome in those with Parkinson’s disease.[i]  Prior to this work, there had not as yet been a consensus as… Continue Reading “Clear Pattern Emerges for Gut Bacterial Alterations in Parkinson’s Disease”

Microbiome Alterations by 12 Months and the Development of Behavioral Issues

One of the many subjects being studied that are of particular interest to me is the long-term effect of alterations to the early, developing microbiome.  There is little doubt at this point that at the very least, the bacterial microbiome, is a huge factor… Continue Reading “Microbiome Alterations by 12 Months and the Development of Behavioral Issues”

The Mycobiome, Diet and Weight

The big biome buzz over the last few days has been about research out of the University of Alabama at Birmingham which showed, in a mouse model, that the fungi of the gut – the mycobiome – plays a major role in how processed… Continue Reading “The Mycobiome, Diet and Weight”

The Flu and the Microbiome: One Reason Those Over 60 Are More At Risk

Back in 2017, I told you about research out of Georgia State University which looked at the effect of probiotics (specifically, Lactobacillus casei) on influenza infection, in an animal model.  The research demonstrated that the probiotic was effective at warding off severe influenza and… Continue Reading “The Flu and the Microbiome: One Reason Those Over 60 Are More At Risk”