Tag: Diabetes

Akkermansia, Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome: An Update

For you fans of Akkermansia who’ve been waiting with baited breath for the next research paper on it, you’re in luck today! Of course, because we’re talking the human biome, nothing is ever simple. Today’s research is a great example of just how immensely… Continue Reading “Akkermansia, Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome: An Update”

A Very Hopeful Huge Step Forward in IBD (and other diseases) Treatment

Good morning, Biome Fans.  Before I launch into today’s cool piece of research, I just wanted to let you all know that going forward, more often than not, I’ll only be blogging once per week, as opposed to the twice I’ve been doing for… Continue Reading “A Very Hopeful Huge Step Forward in IBD (and other diseases) Treatment”

More Reasons for Me to Love My Shirataki Noodles

Several months ago, in order to cut down on some carbohydrates in my diet (I’m pretty much a carb junkie), I started to eat Japanese shirataki noodles that I’d found in my healthfood store.  It was a eureka moment for me when I discovered… Continue Reading “More Reasons for Me to Love My Shirataki Noodles”

Relating Bacterial Microbiome Structure to Specific Diseases: We’re One Step Closer

I wasn’t surprised to see this research out of Harvard University:  it was inevitable. Scientists at Harvard and the Joslin Diabetes Center have analyzed the genetic makeup of bacterial microbiomes and linked these DNA signatures directly to specific diseases.[i]   As more and more… Continue Reading “Relating Bacterial Microbiome Structure to Specific Diseases: We’re One Step Closer”

Even at “Acceptable” Levels, Glyphosate Disrupts the Bacterial Microbiome (rodent study)

My regular readers know that I have been closely following the growing body of research into the effects of glyphosates on human health.  There has been huge controversy over this for years now.  While humans do not have the shikimate pathway that glyphosate (the… Continue Reading “Even at “Acceptable” Levels, Glyphosate Disrupts the Bacterial Microbiome (rodent study)”

Artificial Sweeteners During Pregnancy and Your Baby’s Microbiome

As a nutritionist, one of my (many) areas of interest is in research about the relationship of diet to health.  Today’s research, conducted  by scientists in Canada, actually shocked me.[i]  I did not know that the consumption of artificial sweeteners by pregnant women is… Continue Reading “Artificial Sweeteners During Pregnancy and Your Baby’s Microbiome”

Progress In Finding Targeted Bacteria to Potentially Treat a Variety of Issues

Again, trying to stay positive this month, for the sake of all our mental health:  the results of a recent large, international dietary study including Harvard physicians confirm yet again that a diet rich in plant-based foods is linked with a lower risk of… Continue Reading “Progress In Finding Targeted Bacteria to Potentially Treat a Variety of Issues”

Type 2 Diabetes and Obesity: Specific Probiotic Species to Treat????!!!

In my efforts to start off this New Year on a positive note, I am trying to only share good news this week on the Biome Buzz’ Facebook page, and to write only upbeat posts.  I refuse to let 2021 be a repeat of… Continue Reading “Type 2 Diabetes and Obesity: Specific Probiotic Species to Treat????!!!”

Top Biome News Stories of the Year, Part 1

It’s the last week of the year, so it’s time for the inevitable yearly round-up posts!  There’s a good article on Gut Microbiota for Health summarizing some of the major microbiota scientific breakthroughs this year.[i]  Of course, you read it first here on The… Continue Reading “Top Biome News Stories of the Year, Part 1”

Promising Research: A Probiotic to Battle Obesity and Glucose Metabolism Issues

I think this is a very timely post, considering that we are in the midst of holiday season when we all over-indulge and then, come New Year’s, swear we’ll lose all the pounds we’ve pack on!  Research out of Ireland, University College Cork, first… Continue Reading “Promising Research: A Probiotic to Battle Obesity and Glucose Metabolism Issues”