Tag: antibiotics

Probiotics After Antibiotics? The Answer May Be No

A week ago or so, I got an email from a physician who follows my blog.  He reminded me of research I had seen a few years back, but at that time, had not read the paper myself.  On his recommendation I took a… Continue Reading “Probiotics After Antibiotics? The Answer May Be No”

A Yeast-Derived Metabolite from Kefir: Promising Research in the Fight Against Pathogens and Excessive Inflammation

Researchers at Ben-Gurion University in Israel are working on isolating specific molecules from kefir that can combat pathogenic bacteria and treat inflammatory bowl disease, as well as halt cytokine storms such as seen in severe cases of COVID.[i]  For those unfamiliar with kefir, it… Continue Reading “A Yeast-Derived Metabolite from Kefir: Promising Research in the Fight Against Pathogens and Excessive Inflammation”

Early In Life Exposure to Antibiotics and Altered Brain Development

Some might say it’s self-flagellation, but I can’t help myself reading the latest research into the effects of antibiotics early in life.  By now, my regular readers are all-too-familiar with my son, Alex’s, history.  For those new to The Biome Buzz, Alex is diagnosed… Continue Reading “Early In Life Exposure to Antibiotics and Altered Brain Development”

Parkinson’s Disease, the Microbiome, Gum Disease and More: An April 2021 Update

I have been following the research into Parkinson’s disease for years, having been forced to watch the inevitable physical decline in several friends now who developed the illness frighteningly early in life (40s and 50s).  See here and here for just a couple of… Continue Reading “Parkinson’s Disease, the Microbiome, Gum Disease and More: An April 2021 Update”

The Two Faces of Candida

As you know, I like to keep up on research on all the different components of the human biome, so yesterday,  I read an article in the International Journal of Medial Microbiology about fungi.[i]  There were a bunch of really interesting facts which I’ll… Continue Reading “The Two Faces of Candida”

Microbiome Alterations by 12 Months and the Development of Behavioral Issues

One of the many subjects being studied that are of particular interest to me is the long-term effect of alterations to the early, developing microbiome.  There is little doubt at this point that at the very least, the bacterial microbiome, is a huge factor… Continue Reading “Microbiome Alterations by 12 Months and the Development of Behavioral Issues”

Goin’ Viral: More on Phages and the Microbiome

I’m excited!  More to report to you this week about other parts of the biome!  Tuesday was all about macrobiome/microbiome teamwork; today, I’m focusing on the virome. Researchers have found that certain bacteriophages (remember these are viruses that infect and kill bacteria, and are… Continue Reading “Goin’ Viral: More on Phages and the Microbiome”

Isolating Which Bacterial Species Boost Immune Functioning

As you all know, I like to report on studies done in humans whenever possible, so here goes!  Scientists at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, In New York City, conducted really interesting research on patients who had received bone marrow transplants as part of… Continue Reading “Isolating Which Bacterial Species Boost Immune Functioning”

Gut Bacteria, Sleep and Alterations to Neurotransmitter Production

Researchers in Japan, at the University of Tsukuba, have just published an incredibly interesting study on the bacterial microbiome and sleep.[i]  While it was conducted in mice, it undoubtedly has implications for humans as well.  As you know from my previous posts on the… Continue Reading “Gut Bacteria, Sleep and Alterations to Neurotransmitter Production”

Introducing Proteobiotics: Natural Pathogen Fighters

A new topic – and vocabulary word – for The Biome Buzz:  proteobiotics.  You know that I am very enthused about research into using bacteriophages (viruses native to the human biome which target specific bacteria) as an old/new therapy to deal with infection.  (You… Continue Reading “Introducing Proteobiotics: Natural Pathogen Fighters”