Tag: Alzheimers

The Two Sides of Bacteroides fragilis

Back in May, 2018, I wrote about Bacteriodes fragilis (B. fragilis), a species of bacteria some strains of which are toxic, some of which are highly beneficial.  The main thrust of that post was about how our immune system, when functioning properly, can recognize…

Neurodegnerative and Neuropsychiatric Disorders: Prime Targets for Helminths

Within just a few weeks of each other, two papers have been published looking at the potential of using helminths to treat neurological conditions.  Not surprisingly, both focus on the powerful anti-inflammatory effect of helminths. (For those of you new to helminths:  these are…

The Microbiome and Mental Illness: An Old Story that is Too Far From its Happy Ending

I just finished reading an article from 2018 on mental health and the microbiome that describes some of where we are now, knowledge-wise, and where we need to be before psychobiotics become a treatment norm.[i]  There were multiple pieces of information in it which…

Food Allergy, the Microbiome and Epigenetics

Last week I wrote about how nitric oxide, a communication molecule naturally produced by our bodies, is also produced by the bacteria of our gut.  The molecule attaches to thousands of proteins in our bodies and can turn genes on and off, greatly affecting…

How Do the Microbiota Communicate with Their Host? Scientists Have Cracked the First Mechanism!

I don’t know if you remember but back in  December, I wrote about research into how phages (viruses that kill bacteria) can understand the language of bacteria, allowing them to spy on their fellow gut inhabitants, thereby optimizing their own existence.  Discoveries into inter-species…

Your Blood Type and Your Microbiome

Thanks to Natasha, one of my regular readers, I was introduced this week to a whole new (for me) biome topic.  (Thank you again for that, Natasha!)  Absolutely fascinating stuff. Like me, I’m sure most of you know that the best known way of…

More Evidence for Industrialization Leading to Biome Depletion

Earlier this week, I wrote about a couple of new articles in the lay press about helminths.  When I posted this on Facebook, one of my readers commented that it reminded her of a blog post from this past November, about how the loss…

2018: My Top 10 List of Favorite Stories!

My longer-time readers know that, as we close out another year, I like to take a look back at some of my favorite research stories from these past 12 months.  So here it is…Judy’s “the best of 2018” top 10 list, in chronological order:…

Senescence, Aging…and the Microbiome: Part 2

As I promised last Thursday, I’ll finish talking about the article[i] on aging, the microbiome,  and senescence today. A quick summary of my last post:  the evidence currently available points to a depletion of the microbiota as we age (from diet (for example, older…

Senescence, Aging…and the Microbiome: Part 1

Yesterday evening, I read about a study[i] done by scientists at the University of Salford, in Manchester, UK, that fascinated me enough that it sent me into one of my I-can’t-stop-reading jags. First, a brief explanation:  senescent cells are old cells that have lost…