Category: inflammation

A Very Hopeful Huge Step Forward in IBD (and other diseases) Treatment

Good morning, Biome Fans.  Before I launch into today’s cool piece of research, I just wanted to let you all know that going forward, more often than not, I’ll only be blogging once per week, as opposed to the twice I’ve been doing for… Continue Reading “A Very Hopeful Huge Step Forward in IBD (and other diseases) Treatment”

They Thymus Gland, the Microbiome, and Early Immune System Training

Loads of times, I have talked about how our microbiomes are the earliest instructors for our immune systems, teaching how to distinguish good from bad, and self from non-self.  Many diseases are associated with lessons poorly learned:  autoimmune disease results from the immune system… Continue Reading “They Thymus Gland, the Microbiome, and Early Immune System Training”

Neurodegenerative Diseases and Gut Bacteria: Zeroing in on the Culprits (and the Solution)

My regular readers know that there is a (rapidly) growing body of evidence linking alterations in the bacterial microbiome to neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s, (PD), Alzheimer’s and ALS.  (I have provided you links to just 3 of many previous posts on these topics.)  No… Continue Reading “Neurodegenerative Diseases and Gut Bacteria: Zeroing in on the Culprits (and the Solution)”

A Promising Probiotic Treatment for Leaky Gut

I have talked about impaired tight junctions in the intestinal epithelial lining (i.e. leaky gut) many times on this blog.  (Look here and here, for just two examples.)  We know this is a factor in diseases ranging from Parkinson’s to autism to Celiac disease… Continue Reading “A Promising Probiotic Treatment for Leaky Gut”

A Yeast-Derived Metabolite from Kefir: Promising Research in the Fight Against Pathogens and Excessive Inflammation

Researchers at Ben-Gurion University in Israel are working on isolating specific molecules from kefir that can combat pathogenic bacteria and treat inflammatory bowl disease, as well as halt cytokine storms such as seen in severe cases of COVID.[i]  For those unfamiliar with kefir, it… Continue Reading “A Yeast-Derived Metabolite from Kefir: Promising Research in the Fight Against Pathogens and Excessive Inflammation”

Diet and Your Gut Bacteria: Specific and Consistent Relationships Found

News flash (NOT!):  eating unhealthy food is bad for you. While that is not exactly revolutionary, there is still a lot we don’t know, like exactly how diet affects different bacteria of the human biome.  Thus, I am reporting to you an interesting study… Continue Reading “Diet and Your Gut Bacteria: Specific and Consistent Relationships Found”

Parkinson’s Disease, the Microbiome, Gum Disease and More: An April 2021 Update

I have been following the research into Parkinson’s disease for years, having been forced to watch the inevitable physical decline in several friends now who developed the illness frighteningly early in life (40s and 50s).  See here and here for just a couple of… Continue Reading “Parkinson’s Disease, the Microbiome, Gum Disease and More: An April 2021 Update”

The Two Faces of Candida

As you know, I like to keep up on research on all the different components of the human biome, so yesterday,  I read an article in the International Journal of Medial Microbiology about fungi.[i]  There were a bunch of really interesting facts which I’ll… Continue Reading “The Two Faces of Candida”

Prebiotics: What We Currently Know About Their Use in Neuropsychiatric and Neurodegenerative Diseases

One of the questions I get asked the most by my readers is “what prebiotic and/or probiotic is the best?”  Unfortunately, there is no good answer to that because we just don’t have the research to know.  To boot, everyone’s body is different.  Still,… Continue Reading “Prebiotics: What We Currently Know About Their Use in Neuropsychiatric and Neurodegenerative Diseases”

Crohn’s Disease and the Mycobiome: A Fungus Prevents Wound Healing

I was amazed by new research out of the Washington University in St. Louis done in conjunction with the Cleveland Clinic.  Scientists discovered that a fungus called Debaryomyces hansenii, which is commonly used in the food industry to ripen the surfaces of cheese and… Continue Reading “Crohn’s Disease and the Mycobiome: A Fungus Prevents Wound Healing”