Category: Diabetes

Food Allergy, the Microbiome and Epigenetics

Last week I wrote about how nitric oxide, a communication molecule naturally produced by our bodies, is also produced by the bacteria of our gut.  The molecule attaches to thousands of proteins in our bodies and can turn genes on and off, greatly affecting…

How Do the Microbiota Communicate with Their Host? Scientists Have Cracked the First Mechanism!

I don’t know if you remember but back in  December, I wrote about research into how phages (viruses that kill bacteria) can understand the language of bacteria, allowing them to spy on their fellow gut inhabitants, thereby optimizing their own existence.  Discoveries into inter-species…

A Trio of New Helminth Papers

Three articles were recently published on helminths that are worth sharing with you.  Two studied the immune effects (in rodents) of the species, Hymenolepis diminuta.  (This species is native to rodents and one currently used in helminthic therapy.) The third summarized research into using…

Have I Ever Mentioned that Diet is Key? or…Introducing Roseburia intestinalis

I was introduced to a new probiotic species this morning that sound like it holds a lot of promise:  Roseburia intestinalis.  I came across an article[i] on Gut Microbiota for Health describing research into the beneficial effects of butyrate-producing bacteria on atherosclerotic plaques and…

More Evidence for Industrialization Leading to Biome Depletion

Earlier this week, I wrote about a couple of new articles in the lay press about helminths.  When I posted this on Facebook, one of my readers commented that it reminded her of a blog post from this past November, about how the loss…

The Prophylactic Use of Probiotics (to Combat Microbiome Alterations Due to C-section and Early Life Antibiotic Use)

The article I read yesterday was a natural follow-on from my last post, about autism and its relationship to perturbations in the gut microbiome. This one was about a double-blind, placebo-controlled study using probiotics to restore normal gut microbiota in infants who were either…

Senescence, Aging…and the Microbiome: Part 2

As I promised last Thursday, I’ll finish talking about the article[i] on aging, the microbiome,  and senescence today. A quick summary of my last post:  the evidence currently available points to a depletion of the microbiota as we age (from diet (for example, older…

Senescence, Aging…and the Microbiome: Part 1

Yesterday evening, I read about a study[i] done by scientists at the University of Salford, in Manchester, UK, that fascinated me enough that it sent me into one of my I-can’t-stop-reading jags. First, a brief explanation:  senescent cells are old cells that have lost…

Staying Young, Healthy and Chock Full of Akkermansia

You know how whenever you learn a new word, for example, suddenly it appears everywhere?  I have been having that experience of late with all kinds of tie-ins to recent posts.  Coincidences or…is it just that the Biome Buzz is so trending that I’m…

The Negative (Biome) Side of Moving to the USA

Last week, a really interesting new study[i] was published in the journal, Cell, detailing how immigrating to the USA negatively impacts the gut bacteria.  Researchers looked at people from Southeast Asia and found that there was a significant reduction in the diversity of gut microbes…