Month: March 2018

Clostridium difficile: One Nasty Bug

I found this research really interesting. Clostridium difficile, as many of you know, is a normal part of our gut biome, but heavy infections cause severe and recurrent – sometimes fatal – bouts of diarrhea.  Because the bacteria can form resistant spores when in…

Cancer

Warning:  I am not a ray of sunshine today. Yesterday, I was at the funeral of my very loved aunt, who just died of cancer.  I’ve also lost a grandmother and 3 friends to cancer (leukemia, brain, and liver)…and have had multiple scares with…

An Autism Anniversary

Today is the 22nd anniversary of my son’s diagnosis with autism.  It is always a day of mourning for me:  8030 days of my life spent failing my Alex.  Yes, of course, that sentiment comes from the irrational and emotional part of me.  Rationally,…

2 New Helminth Papers: IBD and Obesity

Two new papers have just come out that provide yet more proof of the importance helminths play in health and a modulated immune response. The first paper[i], published in the American Journal of Physiology, looked at using Hymenolepis diminuta (HD) to prevent inflammatory bowel…

More Great Diet Research…or…Eat More Fiber

According to the CDC, more than 29 million Americans have type 2 diabetes.  Another 86 million American adults (more than 1/3 of the population) have pre-diabetes,  and within 5 years, up to 30% of these will develop it.[i]  The numbers are equally grim in…

News from Dr. Derrick MacFabe: More on Autism and the Bacterial Microbiome

For my regular readers:  you all know I have a whole fan girl thing going on for a few of my favorite researchers.  I’ve written before (here and here, for example) about Dr. Derrick MacFabe, whose research I have followed for many, many years….

Helminths and Mental Health – Research Desperately Needed

I was very excited to see  a new paper[i] by Dr. William Parker and his colleague, Henry Kou, at Duke University, looking at the effects of the loss of our helminths and the relationship to mental illness.  The paper is, in some ways, a…

A Fetal Microbiome? Scientists are Divided

There is a big debate in the scientific world as to when the human microbiome actually starts.  To date, the going hypothesis has been that babies are sterile while in the womb, and then begin to acquire flora as they pass through the birth…

A Healthy Microbiome is Possible for Everyone

More great microbiome research[i] out of  Israel’s Weizman Institute of Science.  (I wrote about some of their work in my last blog post, earlier this week.)  In this case, researchers were attempting to ascertain how much our genes affect the constituents of our bacterial…